Tag Archive for: seeded

Villard Blanc

Villard Blanc is a white French-American hybrid bunch grape that was released in 1937 by Seyve and Villard. Currently, it is frequently grown in eastern and southern states as a fresh-eating table grape or for blending in white wine for a light, neutral flavor. Vines have a semi upright growth habit and are vigorous and productive with large loose clusters that fully mature in late July to late September. While it is susceptible to black rot and Powdery mildew, it has some tolerance to Pierce’s disease, at least in the first 10 years of being grown.

Miss Blanc

Miss Blanc is a white French-American hybrid bunch grape that was released by Mississippi State University in 1982 by J.P Overcash, C.P. Hegwood Jr., and B.J. Stojanovic. It is grown for its usefulness as a mild flavored white wine that has been judged intermediate in quality. Vines are moderately vigorous and productive with medium to large clusters that fully mature in late July to mid-August. While it is susceptible to anthracnose and black rot, it has good tolerance to Pierce’s disease.

Graciano

Graciano is a Spanish red wine grape of ancient origin and has been grown all around the Mediterranean under various synonyms. It is not particularly productive, due to low fertility, small clusters, and small berries, but there has been increased interest in this variety because its fruit quality potential is high, even when grown in warm or hot climates. Its acidity, tannins, and aroma are particularly notable.

Lomanto 6

Lomanto

Lomanto is an interspecific hybrid (Vitis spp.) red wine grape variety with Pierce’s Disease (Xylella fastidiosa) tolerance. Vines are moderate vigor with an upright, spindly growth habit. Clusters are small to medium with medium sized berries. Lomanto produces intensely colored juice and wine. Although Lomanto is primarily grown as a backyard grape, limited commercial acreage exists in Texas and in other states in the Southeastern U.S. Lomanto was developed by Thomas Volney Munson in Denison, Texas in 1902.

Clusters of Black Spanish grapes

Black Spanish

Black Spanish is an interspecific hybrid (Vitis aestivalis x Vitis vinifera L.) red wine grape variety that’s Pierce’s Disease (Xylella fastidiosa) tolerant. Vines are moderate vigor with an upright growth habit and large leaves. In Texas, Black Spanish is productive, producing deeply colored red wines often finished in a Port style. Downy mildew can be a problem under humid, wet conditions. In the U.S., Black Spanish is also known as Lenoir, but in Europe is it primarily known as Jacquez.

Teroldego

Teroldego is an Italian red wine grape of ancient origin. It has compact clusters with medium to large berries. The berries have high anthocyanin content, even in warm climates, and wines are typically fruity, with soft tannins (D’Agato, 2014). Good fruit and wine quality and adaptability to warm and hot climate regions have increased interest in Teroldego in California and elsewhere.

Durif

Durif arose from a natural cross of Peloursin and Syrah in the 1860s in France. Vines have low to moderate vigor and moderate yield potential. Durif berries have high anthocyanin and tannin content, even when grown in warm climates. The berries are prone to sunburn and shrivel, and the clusters to bunch rot. However, these issues can be managed to some extent with appropriate cultural practices. Durif wines are typically dark-colored and full-bodied.

Marselan

Marselan is a red wine grape (Vitis vinifera L.) variety from France that was selected from a planned cross, in 1961, of Cabernet Sauvignon and Garnacha. It was initially neglected because its traits didn’t meet the needs of the industry at the time, but viticulturists came to appreciate its disease resistance and fruit quality, leading to its official release in 1990. Since then, its reputation has only improved, and recent a trial in the San Joaquin Valley of California bolstered its growing reputation for producing high quality red wine grapes in warm and hot climate regions.

Bonarda FPS 02

This article describes a selection of Bonarda (FPS 02), a red wine variety available from Foundation Plant Services, at the University of California Davis. A planting at the UC Kearney Agricultural Center, in Parlier, California, a hot-climate region, produced low to moderate yields of fruit from which excellent quality red wines were consistently produced.

Figure 1. Marsanne fruit, Spirit Canyon Vineyards Ukiah, CA

Marsanne

Marsanne is a white wine grape cultivar native to the Rhône Valley region of France where it is found growing with other white wine grapes including Roussanne, Grenache Blanc, Viognier, Picpoul blanc, Clairette, Picardin and Muscat blanc. In California, it is productive, vigorous and well suited to warm regions (especially Winkler Region III), though it performed poorly in Parlier, a hot region (Winkler Region V). It is not widely grown in the United States. Under the best growing conditions and with skilled wine making, it can be made into long lived and interesting wines, especially when blended with other members of the Rhône wine grape family. It is susceptible to powdery mildew and bunch rot and requires careful attention in the vineyard to show its greatest potential in the wine bottle.